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Opening Reception – 99

99

April 10 – 28, 2017 | First, Second and Third Floor Hallway Galleries

Hours: Mon-Fri, 8am-8pm

Opening Reception: April 20th, 7-9pm

The artwork produced in the Contemporary Photography program at Etobicoke School of the Arts is dynamic, insightful, courageous, and engaging. Forty-three Grade 12 students have developed their own unique and personal bodies of work exploring a range of themes, including relationships, defining personal space, and re-examining the Garden of Eden. These talented artists use photography in ways that can inspire us all.

Follow them on Instagram @esa_contemporary_photography.

Artists: Ashlyn Abbott, Andrew Alburger, Ben Alexandor, Linda Badgley, Kasia Borkowski, Julia Bradshaw, Jamie Brennan, Gemma Brown, Liam Carley, Ava Cvitkovich, Hannah Da Silva, Dakota Dimson, Grier Drummond, Ruby Evers, Jelena Gajdel, Charlotte Gregg, Emma Guy, Julianna Ham, Mikayla Harrison, Reed Hollett, Sam Holzberg, Catriona Iozzo, Liam Macaloney, Georgia Mackay, Josie Marshall, Max Martin, Michael Mazzei, Eliza McFarlane, Aoife O’Mahony, Krystyna Poremba, Alicia Salvador, Quinn Spurrell, Adrian Stathoukos, Basia Thompson, Gill Thorne, Emma Thomlison, Lianna Turone, Gloria Vytas, Lily Watson, Kennedy Wheller, Jada White, Sean Wilson, Xin Xin

Closing Reception – Plastic Coated (2017)

Plastic Coated (2017)

Closing Reception: Thursday, August 24, 2017 | 6–9 PM | FREE

On view July 31 – August 25, 2017 | 3rd Floor Hallway Gallery

Hours: Open Daily 8 AM – 8 PM

Over the last century plastic has taken over the planet. Our modern day living is easy, disposable, and plastic coated.  The material under fire is labeled both a miracle and a curse, saving lives in the medical industry while causing havoc in our oceans.  Plastic Coated is an exhibit by multidisciplinary artist Anya Mielniczek which explores garbage and plastic pollution through material collages that bring awareness to environmental degradation our consumeristic tendencies have.

About the Artist

Mielniczek takes easily discarded materials such as plastic bags and candy wrappers adding value to what is otherwise considered trash. Inspired by waste and the treatment of our natural resources her pieces are emotionally charged, experimental and compiled of layers, textures, and the energy felt in unaltered lines. Decidedly forming a greater narrative pertinent to environmental change –informing herself as well as viewers, of the obstacles our finite world faces in light of our hyper consumption.

Exhibition – MOVING HOME (presented by Critical Distance)

MOVING HOME (presented by Critical Distance)

The Art and Embodiment of Transience Emerging from Canada’s Child Welfare System

August 18 – 26, 2017 | Critical Distance | Suite 302

Hours: On view from 1-6 pm

Opening Reception: Thursday, August 17, 2017 | 6–9 PM | FREE

ZULA, XAVIER BINETTE, WOLFIE, STARCHILD DREAMING

LOUD, SOPHIA NAHZ, SINGING THUNDER, RACHEL MACINTOSH, ODDANE TAYLOR, NICHOLAS RIDICULOUS, M.T. NESS, MICHELLE CHARLIE, JESSIE STONE, GEN GAGNON, ELIJAH M, BETHANY PAPADOPOLOUS, ANONYMOUS, AMELIA MERHAR

Critical Distance is pleased to announce our 2017 Summer Sessions exhibition, Moving Home: The Art and Embodiment of Transience Emerging from Canada’s Child Welfare System. Presented by York University Human Geography master’s candidate Amelia Merhar, this project is the second to be hosted as part of our Summer Sessions initiative, a program through which we support emerging curators and artists by providing free space, mentorship, and installation support for their thesis exhibitions.

How is transience embodied, carried, and performed? How do repeated moves of homes, schools, and communities linger in the body, from the past to the present? What sort of people is the child welfare system inadvertently creating through so many foster and group home placements? Beyond pathologizing transience, what can we learn from the young and hyper-mobile?

Moving Home explores the embodiment of transience as experienced by young people who grew up in the Canadian child welfare system. It is part of Human Geography Master’s thesis research at York University coordinated by Amelia Merhar, inspired by her lived experience in care. Using arts-based, participatory, and Indigenous research methods, Merhar worked with 15 co-researcher artists in their chosen mediums to explore and compare urban/suburban and Northern/rural experiences at the partner youth art organizations SKETCH Working Arts in Toronto and Splintered Craft in Whitehorse. Artistic explorations of the theme of embodied transience include works of photography, textiles, silk-screening, collage, mixed media, dance, performance, music, spoken word, painting, text, jewelry, dream catchers, and installation.

The first Call to Action the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is to reduce the number of Indigenous youth in care in Canada. There are more Indigenous youth in care today than were in Residential Schools. In Toronto, research has shown that Black youth are disproportionately apprehended and stay longer in the system than their non-Black peers (although through recent efforts these numbers are declining). Art alone can’t solve ongoing violence and colonialism; however it is a way to transgress and re-imagine present social boundaries. The goal of arts-based research is to provoke conversations instead of static research conclusions, and we invite you to enter the conversation here with former youth in care and their art.

The show opening is preceded by a research presentation at the Ontario Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth Office from 1-3 pm and the launch of the project zine, TL;DR, a thesis in a zine. All are welcome. 


This project was awarded the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada–Master’s Scholarship –Award to Honour Nelson Mandela in 2016, recognizing its commitment to youth participation. Funding for co-researcher artist honoraria and art supplies provided by Ontario Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth, and the Yukon Child and Youth Advocate. Northern travel and living expenses supported by Northern Scientific Training Fund–Government of Canada.

Opening Reception – MOVING HOME (presented by Critical Distance)

MOVING HOME (presented by Critical Distance)

The Art and Embodiment of Transience Emerging from Canada’s Child Welfare System

Opening Reception: Thursday, August 17, 2017 | 6–9 PM | FREE

August 18 – 26, 2017 | Critical Distance | Suite 302

Hours: On view from 1-6 pm

ZULA, XAVIER BINETTE, WOLFIE, STARCHILD DREAMING

LOUD, SOPHIA NAHZ, SINGING THUNDER, RACHEL MACINTOSH, ODDANE TAYLOR, NICHOLAS RIDICULOUS, M.T. NESS, MICHELLE CHARLIE, JESSIE STONE, GEN GAGNON, ELIJAH M, BETHANY PAPADOPOLOUS, ANONYMOUS, AMELIA MERHAR

Critical Distance is pleased to announce our 2017 Summer Sessions exhibition, Moving Home: The Art and Embodiment of Transience Emerging from Canada’s Child Welfare System. Presented by York University Human Geography master’s candidate Amelia Merhar, this project is the second to be hosted as part of our Summer Sessions initiative, a program through which we support emerging curators and artists by providing free space, mentorship, and installation support for their thesis exhibitions.

How is transience embodied, carried, and performed? How do repeated moves of homes, schools, and communities linger in the body, from the past to the present? What sort of people is the child welfare system inadvertently creating through so many foster and group home placements? Beyond pathologizing transience, what can we learn from the young and hyper-mobile?

Moving Home explores the embodiment of transience as experienced by young people who grew up in the Canadian child welfare system. It is part of Human Geography Master’s thesis research at York University coordinated by Amelia Merhar, inspired by her lived experience in care. Using arts-based, participatory, and Indigenous research methods, Merhar worked with 15 co-researcher artists in their chosen mediums to explore and compare urban/suburban and Northern/rural experiences at the partner youth art organizations SKETCH Working Arts in Toronto and Splintered Craft in Whitehorse. Artistic explorations of the theme of embodied transience include works of photography, textiles, silk-screening, collage, mixed media, dance, performance, music, spoken word, painting, text, jewelry, dream catchers, and installation.

The first Call to Action the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is to reduce the number of Indigenous youth in care in Canada. There are more Indigenous youth in care today than were in Residential Schools. In Toronto, research has shown that Black youth are disproportionately apprehended and stay longer in the system than their non-Black peers (although through recent efforts these numbers are declining). Art alone can’t solve ongoing violence and colonialism; however it is a way to transgress and re-imagine present social boundaries. The goal of arts-based research is to provoke conversations instead of static research conclusions, and we invite you to enter the conversation here with former youth in care and their art.

The show opening is preceded by a research presentation at the Ontario Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth Office from 1-3 pm and the launch of the project zine, TL;DR, a thesis in a zine. All are welcome. 


This project was awarded the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada–Master’s Scholarship –Award to Honour Nelson Mandela in 2016, recognizing its commitment to youth participation. Funding for co-researcher artist honoraria and art supplies provided by Ontario Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth, and the Yukon Child and Youth Advocate. Northern travel and living expenses supported by Northern Scientific Training Fund–Government of Canada.

 

Exhibition – Plastic Coated (2017)

Plastic Coated (2017)

July 31 – August 25, 2017 | 3rd Floor Hallway Gallery

Hours: Open Daily 8 AM – 8 PM

Closing Reception: Thursday, August 24, 2017 | 6–9 PM | FREE

Over the last century plastic has taken over the planet. Our modern day living is easy, disposable, and plastic coated.  The material under fire is labeled both a miracle and a curse, saving lives in the medical industry while causing havoc in our oceans.  Plastic Coated is an exhibit by multidisciplinary artist Anya Mielniczek which explores garbage and plastic pollution through material collages that bring awareness to environmental degradation our consumeristic tendencies have.

About the Artist

Mielniczek takes easily discarded materials such as plastic bags and candy wrappers adding value to what is otherwise considered trash. Inspired by waste and the treatment of our natural resources her pieces are emotionally charged, experimental and compiled of layers, textures, and the energy felt in unaltered lines. Decidedly forming a greater narrative pertinent to environmental change –informing herself as well as viewers, of the obstacles our finite world faces in light of our hyper consumption.

Exhibition – Not Sad Cold And Dead (like you thought)

Not Sad Cold And Dead (like you thought) 

July 24 – September 2, 2017 | 2nd Floor Hallway Gallery

Hours: Open Daily 8 AM – 8 PM

Closing Reception: Thursday, August 24, 2017 | 6–9 PM | FREE

Organized by An Dy and Emma Steen

From an Art College consistently defined by phrases such as struggling, underfunded, rising tuitions, financial woes, mitigating the debt, and so on, we see people ask—here directly pulled from one 2012 Art Threat article —“what’s the value in art school?”

Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University, or NSCAD, an opportunity to showcase the work coming out of a school whose students continues to thrive under less than ideal circumstances.  A university the size of NSCAD can take a lot of hits as the public eats up the drama in the death of an institution. While the administration peters around doing what it can to stop money leaking out of every crack and crevasse, we continue to see NSCAD students reacting to this environmental pressure and pressing on, creating work that has a distinct air of enthusiasm under what is now the fleeting passé that there’s not much happening east of Montréal.

GENERATORS – Artist, Director, and Curator discussion
image left: Grace Ambrose, Marc Fischer and Public Collectors, Hardcore Architecture (cover), 2016; right: Eric Oglander, image from Craigslist Mirrors, ongoing

CDCC and TOABF are pleased to present

GENERATORS

June 16–18, 2017 | Opening Thursday, June 15th from 6–10 pm

Hours: Exhibition on view at Critical Distance in Suite 302 at Artscape Youngplace during Fair hours, Fri–Sat from 12–8 pm and Sun from 12–6.

Discussion: Sunday, June 18 | 2 pm |

with artist Erika DeFreitas, CDCC Director Shani K Parsons, and exhibition curator Anthony Stepter

Suite 101 (Small World Music) | Free

 

Image left: Grace Ambrose, Marc Fischer and Public Collectors, Hardcore Architecture (cover), 2016; right: Eric Oglander, image from Craigslist Mirrors, ongoing

How do we see art in the age of image and information overload? Is a gallery the best place to look, or is the internet’s efficiency and long reach a better tool for engaging with artists’ ideas? What about the reliable old standby, printed books?

The artworks on view in this exhibition highlight the fluidity of media in contemporary culture. Each project in Generators is guided by a single idea, approach, or rule. These frameworks generate troves of material for the artists to assemble and present in a manner that invites viewers to make connections that might otherwise go unnoticed. Many of the artworks draw from, or exist as, both printed media and digital spaces. These transmutations afford artists and viewers illuminating points of entry for exploring the unique properties of both printed and digital narratives without being constrained by traditional definitions of the archive and the artist’s book.

Selected from a joint call for submissions, Generators celebrates the astonishing diversity of outcomes that can arise from intentionally constrained modes of collecting and creating. The exhibited works circulate through a variety of platforms, from humble Tumblrs to museum exhibitions. By focusing on projects that start with simple ideas but evolve to open up wide ranging possibilities for engagement and display, Generators pushes against notions of presentation that privilege one form of media over another.

About the Artists and Curator

Erika DeFreitas is a multidisciplinary conceptual artist who explores the influence of language, loss and culture on the formation of identity. She has exhibited internationally and is a recipient of the 2016 Finalist Artist Prize from the Toronto Friends of Visual Arts. Edie Fake was born in Chicagoland and is now based in Southern California. Through his comics, zines, prints, drawings, and installations, he imagines and reimagines the world. In 2007, Chicago-based Marc Fischer founded Public Collectors to address the lack of many kinds of cultural artifacts in the public collections of libraries, museums and other archives. Baltimore artist Dina Kelberman’s work spans a wide range of media including web-based projects, comics, photography, installation, and writing. She has exhibited and published internationally and is a founding member of the Wham City artist collective. Nellie Kluz is a Chicago-based filmmaker who often focuses on social interactions, belief systems and material realities. She received a 2016 Princess Grace Film Scholarship and her work has been presented at film festivals internationally. Sanaz Mazinani was born in Tehran and is currently based in San Francisco and Toronto. Her work ranges from digital collages and works on paper to large-scale installations, and is regularly exhibited in galleries, museums, and public spaces throughout the world. Eric Oglander is a Brooklyn-based multidisciplinary artist whose collection of sometimes humourous, sometimes poetic, found images from Craigslist has gained international attention. Los Angeles-based Leah Wellbaum is an artist and musician who has published four books of photography including The Fucking Ocean and The Fucking Ocean Part 2. Exhibition curator Anthony Stepter is the Graduate Program Coordinator for Museum and Exhibition Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He holds an MA in Visual and Cultural Studies from the Art Institute of Chicago.

Complete profiles for all of the artists and the curator will be posted to our website soon

 

TORONTO ART BOOK FAIR 2017 / WWW.TORONTOARTBOOKFAIR.COM / ARTSCAPE YOUNGPLACE 

CRITICAL DISTANCE CENTRE FOR CURATORS (CDCC) / SUITE 302 AT ARTSCAPE YOUNGPLACE WWW.CRITICALDISTANCE.CA

Website / Twitter / Facebook / Instagram
Critical Distance is a not-for-profit initiative and space devoted to the support and advancement of curatorial practice in Toronto, Canada, and beyond. Part gallery and publisher, part professional association and community, CDCC is an open platform for diverse curatorial practices and perspectives, and a forum for ideas on curating and exhibition-making as ways to engage and inform audiences from all walks of life. For more info, visit our website or social media pages, linked above.

Artist Panel – Related Items

Saturday, June 17th

Featuring artists; Tsēma Igharas, Basil Alzeri, Myung-Sun Kim, and Lisa Myers and hosted by curator Nasrin Himada

 4pm | Studio 101 | FREE

Related Items is on view from June 14 – June 18, 2017, in the Third Floor Hallway Galleries

Hours: Open Daily 8 AM – 8 PM

Curated by art Metropole’s Nasrin Himada and Michael Pace, and Emma Sharpe

Art Metropole is a not-for-profit organization focused on the distribution and contextualization of artist-initiated publication in any media, especially those formats and practices predisposed to sharing and circulation. It was founded in 1974 by the Artists’ Collective General Idea.

Publication is a social space. Through expanded conversation around artist publishing, AM aims to provide incentive for readers, ultimately creating new formats for the sharing of ideas, materials, and knowledge. For the Toronto Art Book Fair, AM has selected a series of multiples, prints, zines, and audio works that encourage participation around and through their format. AM’s booth will occupy the display, which will also host gastronomic editions, listening stations, areas for reading and resting, and more.

Discussion: Posters + Student Work, Garry Neill Kennedy, Cathy Busby, and Roger Bywater

Discussion: Friday, June 16th | Garry Neill Kennedy, Cathy Busby, and Roger Bywater | 6:30pm | Studio 101 | FREE

Posters + Student Work

June 14 – June 18, 2017 | First and Second Floor Hallway Galleries

Hours: Open Daily 8 AM – 8 PM

Posters + Student Work is from the collection of Garry Neill Kennedy and Cathy Busby.

“Our poster collection is an accumulation found here and there among our possessions. We will show a selection from: The See Red Women’s Workshop (a feminist silk-screen poster collective, London, 1974-90); a selection from Portikus (the gallery of Stadelschule, Frankfurt) from the early 1990s; some Chinese propaganda posters (1960s); a selection of Halifax event posters (2000s); some individual artist posters by Claes Oldenburg; Lawrence Weiner; A-yo; Bruce Nauman; General Idea; Cathy Busby; Garry Neill Kennedy.

We’ll also present class books, 1990 – 2017. In these publications students contribute a work of one or many pages and the edition provides everyone with a copy of the resulting book. Garry started the ‘Class Book’ tradition when he began teaching printed matter in 1990, first at NSCAD and then UBC since 2013 with Cathy Busby. Following up on this exhibition, we’ll be making a publication about our student’s artist books, 1990 – 2017, to be launched at the Vancouver Art Book Fair, Oct 2017.” – Cathy Busby and Garry Neill Kennedy

 

Image: Printed Matter class co-taught by Garry Neill Kennedy and Cathy Busby, University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, with Cathy Busby’s We Are Sorry in Witnesses: Art and Canada’s Indian Residential Schools, Belkin Art Gallery, UBC, 2013

GENERATORS – presented by CDCC and TOABF
image left: Grace Ambrose, Marc Fischer and Public Collectors, Hardcore Architecture (cover), 2016; right: Eric Oglander, image from Craigslist Mirrors, ongoing

CDCC and TOABF are pleased to present

GENERATORS

June 16–18, 2017 | Opening Thursday, June 15th from 6–10 pm

Hours: Exhibition on view at Critical Distance in Suite 302 at Artscape Youngplace during Fair hours, Fri–Sat from 12–8 pm and Sun from 12–6.

Preview Reception: Thursday, June 15 |  6–10 pm | Free

Discussion: Sunday, June 18 | 2 pm | with artist Erika DeFreitas, CDCC Director Shani K Parsons, and exhibition curator Anthony Stepter | Suite 101 (Small World Music) | Free

Artists: Erika DeFreitas, Edie Fake, Marc Fischer/Public Collectors, Dina Kelberman, Nellie Kluz, Sanaz Mazinani, Eric Oglander, and Leah Wellbaum

Curated by Anthony Stepter

 

 

Image left: Grace Ambrose, Marc Fischer and Public Collectors, Hardcore Architecture (cover), 2016; right: Eric Oglander, image from Craigslist Mirrors, ongoing

How do we see art in the age of image and information overload? Is a gallery the best place to look, or is the internet’s efficiency and long reach a better tool for engaging with artists’ ideas? What about the reliable old standby, printed books?

The artworks on view in this exhibition highlight the fluidity of media in contemporary culture. Each project in Generators is guided by a single idea, approach, or rule. These frameworks generate troves of material for the artists to assemble and present in a manner that invites viewers to make connections that might otherwise go unnoticed. Many of the artworks draw from, or exist as, both printed media and digital spaces. These transmutations afford artists and viewers illuminating points of entry for exploring the unique properties of both printed and digital narratives without being constrained by traditional definitions of the archive and the artist’s book.

Selected from a joint call for submissions, Generators celebrates the astonishing diversity of outcomes that can arise from intentionally constrained modes of collecting and creating. The exhibited works circulate through a variety of platforms, from humble Tumblrs to museum exhibitions. By focusing on projects that start with simple ideas but evolve to open up wide ranging possibilities for engagement and display, Generators pushes against notions of presentation that privilege one form of media over another.

About the Artists and Curator

Erika DeFreitas is a multidisciplinary conceptual artist who explores the influence of language, loss and culture on the formation of identity. She has exhibited internationally and is a recipient of the 2016 Finalist Artist Prize from the Toronto Friends of Visual Arts. Edie Fake was born in Chicagoland and is now based in Southern California. Through his comics, zines, prints, drawings, and installations, he imagines and reimagines the world. In 2007, Chicago-based Marc Fischer founded Public Collectors to address the lack of many kinds of cultural artifacts in the public collections of libraries, museums and other archives. Baltimore artist Dina Kelberman’s work spans a wide range of media including web-based projects, comics, photography, installation, and writing. She has exhibited and published internationally and is a founding member of the Wham City artist collective. Nellie Kluz is a Chicago-based filmmaker who often focuses on social interactions, belief systems and material realities. She received a 2016 Princess Grace Film Scholarship and her work has been presented at film festivals internationally. Sanaz Mazinani was born in Tehran and is currently based in San Francisco and Toronto. Her work ranges from digital collages and works on paper to large-scale installations, and is regularly exhibited in galleries, museums, and public spaces throughout the world. Eric Oglander is a Brooklyn-based multidisciplinary artist whose collection of sometimes humourous, sometimes poetic, found images from Craigslist has gained international attention. Los Angeles-based Leah Wellbaum is an artist and musician who has published four books of photography including The Fucking Ocean and The Fucking Ocean Part 2. Exhibition curator Anthony Stepter is the Graduate Program Coordinator for Museum and Exhibition Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He holds an MA in Visual and Cultural Studies from the Art Institute of Chicago.

Complete profiles for all of the artists and the curator will be posted to our website soon.

 

 

 

 

TORONTO ART BOOK FAIR 2017 / WWW.TORONTOARTBOOKFAIR.COM / ARTSCAPE YOUNGPLACE 

CRITICAL DISTANCE CENTRE FOR CURATORS (CDCC) / SUITE 302 AT ARTSCAPE YOUNGPLACE WWW.CRITICALDISTANCE.CA

Website / Twitter / Facebook / Instagram
Critical Distance is a not-for-profit initiative and space devoted to the support and advancement of curatorial practice in Toronto, Canada, and beyond. Part gallery and publisher, part professional association and community, CDCC is an open platform for diverse curatorial practices and perspectives, and a forum for ideas on curating and exhibition-making as ways to engage and inform audiences from all walks of life. For more info, visit our website or social media pages, linked above.