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Opening Reception & Curator’s Talk: FORWARD FACING

FORWARD FACING

Opening Reception & Curator’s Talk: April 21, 2018 | 2-4 PM | FREE

Exhibition Hours: April 5 – June 3, 2018 | Critical Distance Centre for Curators (Suite 302)

Gallery Hours: Thursday–Sunday from 12–5 pm (except statutory holidays) and by appointment. Information to plan your visit or get in touch can be found here.

Critical Distance and Aboriginal Curatorial Collective present FORWARD FACING, curated by Cass Gardiner (Toronto/Brooklyn). Forward Facing examines intersectionality within Indigenous identity through the photographic, video, craft, and installation practices of Dayna Danger (Montreal), Lacie Burning (Vancouver), and Jade Nasogaluak Carpenter (Calgary).

Indigenous peoples from across Turtle Island express and assert their identity in conversation with their cultural roots in a multitude of ways, and always in tandem with ever-looming colonialism. Utilizing the device of the mask, the artists in Forward Facing provoke and question how the face – or the absence of it – creates a powerful commentary on contemporary Indigenous culture.

Bike Tube Flogger-Making Workshop with Dayna Danger: April 22 from 2-4 pm at Project Studio.

CRITICAL DISTANCE (CDCC)

Suite 302 at Artscape Youngplace | 180 Shaw Street | Toronto | Ontario | M6J 2W5

click for map
GALLERY / OFFICE HOURS
Gallery hours are Friday–Sunday 12–5 pm and by appointment through November 26th. Office hours by appointment only.
Website / Twitter / Facebook / Instagram

Critical Distance is a not-for-profit initiative and space devoted to the support and advancement of curatorial practice in Toronto, Canada, and beyond. Part gallery and publisher, part professional association and community, CDCC is an open platform for diverse curatorial practices and perspectives, and a forum for ideas on curating and exhibition-making as ways to engage and inform audiences from all walks of life. For more info, visit our website or social media pages, linked above.

Exhibition: FORWARD FACING

FORWARD FACING

April 5 – June 3, 2018 | Critical Distance Centre for Curators (Suite 302)

Gallery Hours: Thursday–Sunday from 12–5 pm (except statutory holidays) and by appointment. Information to plan your visit or get in touch can be found here.

Critical Distance and Aboriginal Curatorial Collective present FORWARD FACING, curated by Cass Gardiner (Toronto/Brooklyn). Forward Facing examines intersectionality within Indigenous identity through the photographic, video, craft, and installation practices of Dayna Danger (Montreal), Lacie Burning (Vancouver), and Jade Nasogaluak Carpenter (Calgary).

Indigenous peoples from across Turtle Island express and assert their identity in conversation with their cultural roots in a multitude of ways, and always in tandem with ever-looming colonialism. Utilizing the device of the mask, the artists in Forward Facing provoke and question how the face – or the absence of it – creates a powerful commentary on contemporary Indigenous culture.

Bike Tube Flogger-Making Workshop with Dayna Danger: April 22 from 2-4 pm at Project Studio.

 

CRITICAL DISTANCE (CDCC)

Suite 302 at Artscape Youngplace | 180 Shaw Street | Toronto | Ontario | M6J 2W5

click for map
GALLERY / OFFICE HOURS
Gallery hours are Friday–Sunday 12–5 pm and by appointment through November 26th. Office hours by appointment only.
Website / Twitter / Facebook / Instagram

 

Critical Distance is a not-for-profit initiative and space devoted to the support and advancement of curatorial practice in Toronto, Canada, and beyond. Part gallery and publisher, part professional association and community, CDCC is an open platform for diverse curatorial practices and perspectives, and a forum for ideas on curating and exhibition-making as ways to engage and inform audiences from all walks of life. For more info, visit our website or social media pages, linked above.

Exhibition: Esther Shalev-Gerz

Esther Shalev-Gerz

Curated by Mona Filip

April 5 – June 3, 2018 | Koffler  Gallery

Hours: Tuesday to Friday 12 PM – 6 PM, Saturday & Sunday 11 AM – 5 PM, Closed Mondays & Statutory Holidays

Spring Opening Reception: Thursday, April 5, 2018 | 6–9 PM | FREE

 

Internationally recognized for her significant contributions in the field of public art, photography, and video installation, Paris-based artist Esther Shalev-Gerz consistently investigates the construction of memory, history, nature, democracy, and cultural identity. The Koffler Gallery presents Shalev-Gerz’ first exhibition in Toronto, bringing together four video and photography installations that explore memory and migration. Developed through active dialogue with diverse communities, these projects foreground participants’ individual and collective experiences.

With thoughtful, nuanced approaches to collaboration, Shalev-Gerz’s artworks confront the practice of portraiture, considering how it may address contemporary politics of representation. Examining the impact of time and space on identity constructions, places, and (hi)stories, these works record, critique, and expand the understanding of the social role of artistic practice.

Esther Shalev-Gerz (born Gilinsky) was born in Vilnius, Lithuania. Her family moved to Jerusalem in 1957, where she graduated from Bezalel Academy of Art and Design. She briefly lived in New York in 1980-1981, and since 1984 she lives and works between Paris and Cortes Island, Canada. In 2010 and 2012 two major retrospective exhibitions respectively displayed ten and fifteen of her installations, first at Jeu de Paume, Paris then at the Musée des Beaux Arts de Lausanne. Space Between Time, her one-woman exhibition at Wasserman Projects, Detroit presented nine of her installations between April and July 2016. She has exhibited internationally in, amongst other places, San Francisco, Paris, Berlin, London, Stockholm, Vancouver, Finland, Geneva, Guangzhou and New York. She designed and realized permanent installations in public space in Hamburg, Israel, Stockholm, Wanas, Geneva, Glasgow and more. She is currently producing her latest permanent art work, The Shadow in Vancouver, Canada. For more information: www.shalev-gerz.net

Opening reception – Soft: transformative queer love and care

Soft: transformative queer love and care

Opening Reception: Thursday November 2, 2017 6pm-9pm 

Exhibition Dates: November 2, 2017 – November 24, 2017

Hours: Monday-Sunday 8am-9pm

The Centre for Emerging Artists & Designers at OCAD U congratulates Morgan Sears-Williams on the creation of this new photo documentary series and installation as the recipient of the 2017 Artscape Youngplace Career Launcher prize.

SOFT: transformative queer love and care explores the different manifestations of love and care and the intersections with politicized bodies, protest and reclamation of space. Where are the unexpected spaces where love and care manifest? What spaces are seen as more ‘legitimate’ than others? How can we challenge the idea of legitimacy of love and care within an intersectional queer lens?

As part of this Career Launcher, Madison Leeson, a graduate of OCAD U’s Curatorial and Criticism Practice program was commissioned to conduct an interview with the artist as well as a small essay to accompany the solo exhibition.

The artist would like to acknowledge the Mississaugas of New Credit, the Haudenosaunee and the Huron-Wendat, the original keepers of this land, for hosting us during the reception and for the duration of the show. We are very grateful to have the opportunity to live and work on this land.

Exhibition – Soft: transformative queer love and care

Soft: transformative queer love and care

November 2, 2017 – November 24, 2017

2nd Floor Hallway Gallery

Hours: Monday-Sunday 8am-9pm

Opening Reception: Thursday November 2, 2017 6pm-9pm 

The Centre for Emerging Artists & Designers at OCAD U congratulates Morgan Sears-Williams on the creation of this new photo documentary series and installation as the recipient of the 2017 Artscape Youngplace Career Launcher prize.

SOFT: transformative queer love and care explores the different manifestations of love and care and the intersections with politicized bodies, protest and reclamation of space. Where are the unexpected spaces where love and care manifest? What spaces are seen as more ‘legitimate’ than others? How can we challenge the idea of legitimacy of love and care within an intersectional queer lens?

As part of this Career Launcher, Madison Leeson, a graduate of OCAD U’s Curatorial and Criticism Practice program was commissioned to conduct an interview with the artist as well as a small essay to accompany the solo exhibition.

The artist would like to acknowledge the Mississaugas of New Credit, the Haudenosaunee and the Huron-Wendat, the original keepers of this land, for hosting us during the reception and for the duration of the show. We are very grateful to have the opportunity to live and work on this land.

Exhibition: Staring Back at the Sun: Video Art from Israel, 1970-2012

Staring Back at the Sun: Video Art from Israel, 1970-2012

September 14 – November 26, 2017 | Koffler Gallery

Hours: Tuesday to Friday 12 PM – 6 PM, Saturday & Sunday 11 AM – 5 PM, Closed Mondays & Statutory Holidays

Fall Opening Reception: Thursday, September 14, 2017 | 6–9 PM | FREE

‘Staring Back at the Sun: Video Art from Israel, 1970-2012’ traces the development of contemporary video practice in Israel and highlights work by artists who take an incisive, critical perspective towards the cultural and political landscape in Israel and beyond. Produced and circulated by Artis as an internationally touring exhibition and program (2016-2018), the project showcases the work of 38 artists, including early performances, films and videos never before presented outside of Israel. Divided into four historic and thematic sections, ‘Staring Back at the Sun’ focuses on the activist impulse in video art-making in Israel over the last four decades. Informed by the international history of video art, the exhibition traces the development of the medium in Israel and explores how artists have employed technology and material to examine the socio-political status quo, through themes such as the prominence of political conflict in mass media; the liberalization of the economy; and the impact of free market politics on Israeli culture.

IMAGE CREDIT:  Rona Yefman and Tanja Schlander, still from Pippi Longstocking, The Strongest Girl in the World, 2006 – 2008, single channel HD video.

Exhibition – MINDSET 2017
Image: Brad Necyk – Just A Hard Rain

MINDSET 2017

May 1 – 27, 2017 | Second Floor Hallway Galleries

Hours: Open Daily 8 AM – 8 PM

Opening Reception: Thursday, May 4, 2017 | 6:00 – 9:00 PM | FREE

Image: Brad Necyk – Just A Hard Rain

This exhibition examines how individual and collective experiences of trauma, injury, illness, isolation, recovery, and adjustment are processed; aided and abetted by personal and interpersonal beliefs and behaviours.

ARTISTS: Teresa Ascenção, Stephanie Avery, Marco Buonocore, Cara Cole, Heather Fulton, Sheldon Laporte, Esmond Lee, Barbara Mann, Jaye Martin, Anita McKernan, Brad Necyk, Julie Riemersma, Annette Seip, Tanya Louise Workman

Curator: Claudette Abrams

Advisors: Jeff Bierk, Yuula Benivolski & Tanya Louise Workman

Contact the exhibitor:

HTTP://WWW.WORKMANARTS.COM/MINDSET-2017

CLAUDETTE_ABRAMS@WORKMANARTS.COM

MINDSET 2017
Image: Brad Necyk – Just A Hard Rain

This exhibition examines how individual and collective experiences of trauma, injury, illness, isolation, recovery, and adjustment are processed; aided and abetted by personal and interpersonal beliefs and behaviours.

ARTISTS: Teresa Ascenção, Stephanie Avery, Marco Buonocore, Cara Cole, Heather Fulton, Sheldon Laporte, Esmond Lee, Barbara Mann, Jaye Martin, Anita McKernan, Brad Necyk, Julie Riemersma, Annette Seip, Tanya Louise Workman

Curator: Claudette Abrams

Advisors: Jeff Bierk, Yuula Benivolski & Tanya Louise Workman

Part of the Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival

2Fik: His and Other Stories
Image: 2Fik - His and Other Stories

Assuming the multiple roles of artistic director, photographer and model, Montreal-based artist 2Fik stages elaborate tableaux in which he single-handedly plays a cast of characters, both male and female, often re-enacting familiar compositions derived from famous paintings. His photo and performance based works toy with reality and dismantle stereotypes, destabilizing the viewer’s assumed points of reference.

As 2Fik’s first solo show in Toronto, His and Other Stories brings together three recent bodies of work that examine cultural legacies as well as individual and national identity constructs. The centrepieces of the exhibition are his latest compositions that dismantle and reconfigure allegorical representations of nationhood reflected in several historic paintings.

Raising irreverent questions, these satirical reinterpretations subvert the absolutes of nationalistic discourses opening them up to the complex and pluralistic realities of today.

A Primary Exhibition of the 2017 Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival.

Exhibition – Not a Place on a Map: the Desh Pardesh Project

Not a Place on a Map: the Desh Pardesh Project

May 26 – June 9, 2016 | First Floor Hallway Galleries

Hours: Monday to Sunday 8 AM – 9 PM, Closed Statutory Holidays

Desh Pardesh (“home away from home” in Hindustani) was a groundbreaking multidisciplinary arts festival that took hold of the GTA from 1988-2001. Desh was dedicated to providing a venue for underrepresented and marginalized voices within the South Asian diaspora. Programming and conversations about feminism, class, sexuality, access, disability, race, caste, imperialism, and capitalism were central to the festival’s existence.

Drawing from the history of Desh Pardesh Not a Place on a Map,  facilitates intergenerational relationships between artists and activists of colour based in Toronto. This three-year initiative includes an oral history project about Desh, a mentorship program, social gatherings, exhibitions, workshops, and the development of an online archive.

This exhibition will offer excerpts from recent interviews with Desh members, alongside rare photographs and video footage of the festival. It will provide glimpses of the socio-political context into which Desh inserted itself, as well as a series of snapshots of the urgent and complex home away from home the festival served for so many.

Desh inspired and fostered the growth of many artistic and community-based initiatives, including SAVAC (South Asian Visual Arts Centre). SAVAC is a non-profit, artist-run centre that works to increase the visibility of artists of colour by curating and exhibiting their work, providing mentorship, and facilitating professional development.

To get involved in the Not a Place on a Map project, contact Anna Malla at anna@savac.net.

Facebook: “Not a Place on a Map: the Desh Pardesh Project”

Twitter: @Desh_Project