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Opening Reception for FERMENTING FEMINISM 

FERMENTING FEMINISM Opening Reception

SHARLENE BAMBOAT, HAZEL MEYER, LEILA NADIR and CARY PEPPERMINT, SARAH NASBY, KAYLA POLAN, WALTER SCOTT, AGUSTINE ZEGERS 

Curated by LAUREN FOURNIER

Opening Reception: Thursday, September 14th from 6–9 pm

ON VIEW SEPTEMBER 14–NOVEMBER 26, 2017, 12–5 PM | Critical Distance | Suite 302

Fermenting Feminism is a multidisciplinary project that takes different forms: beginning as a publication in collaboration with Lauren Fournier and the Laboratory for Aesthetics and Ecology, it has evolved into site-specific exhibitions, installations, and screenings in Toronto, Berlin, Copenhagen, and Kansas City. This exhibition at Critical Distance marks the Canadian launch of this project. The site-specific evolution of Fermenting Feminism instantiates the context-specificity of microbes and fungi, of fermenting bodies, and of feminisms.

Please join us for an opening reception with the curator on Thursday, September 14th from 6–9 pm. Refreshments will be served and all are welcome.

Our reception is the same night as Koffler Gallery’s fall exhibition opening downstairs — two for one at Artscape Youngplace this evening!

 

CRITICAL DISTANCE (CDCC)

Suite 302 at Artscape Youngplace | 180 Shaw Street | Toronto | Ontario | M6J 2W5

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GALLERY / OFFICE HOURS
Gallery hours are Friday–Sunday 12–5 pm and by appointment through November 26th. Office hours by appointment only.
Website / Twitter / Facebook / Instagram

 

Critical Distance is a not-for-profit initiative and space devoted to the support and advancement of curatorial practice in Toronto, Canada, and beyond. Part gallery and publisher, part professional association and community, CDCC is an open platform for diverse curatorial practices and perspectives, and a forum for ideas on curating and exhibition-making as ways to engage and inform audiences from all walks of life. For more info, visit our website or social media pages, linked above.

image: Sarah Nasby, Living Things (Dorothy Hafner vessel, kombucha, lines pattern), 2017

Opening Reception – FUTURE LEGACY DESIGN FOR CANADA’S NEXT 150 YEARS | THE SITE MAGAZINE

FUTURE LEGACY

DESIGN FOR CANADA’S NEXT 150 YEARS | THE SITE MAGAZINE

September 8 – September 15, 2017 | 3rd Floor Hallway Gallery

Hours: Open Daily 8 AM – 8 PM

Opening reception Friday, Sept 8th, 7–9 pm

Featuring Competition winners: Ali Navidbakhsh, Evan Wakelin, Karan Manchanda, Sarah Gunawan, and Shelley Long; plus Runners-up: Anna Longrigg + Jason McMillan, Fionn Byrne, Kyung-Kuhn Lee + Mamata Guragain + Nubras Samayeen, Mitchell Gray, and Rob McIntosh; and Honourable mentions: Dominique Cheng, Émélie Desrochers-Turgeon, Emma Mendel, Stephanie Mauer, and Studio Ha-ha

Future Legacy: Design for Canada’s Next 150 Years is an exhibition featuring winners of The Site Magazine’s inaugural design competition. In the context of Canada’s sesquicentennial, entrants were challenged to develop proposals that considered the relationship between the nation’s history, current context, and possible future trajectories. The submissions, which came from across the nation, as well as seven different countries internationally, reflect the spectrum of Canadian geography, culture, population, and politics, and raise pertinent questions to be considered as we move forward collectively.
The winning projects, selected by a jury of Canadian and international designers and thinkers, represent a diverse range of notions of Canada’s identity and legacy, ranging from the scale of the entire country to that of a suburban single-family home. Along the third-floor hallway of Artscape Youngplace, images and text by the five competition winners, five runners-up, and five honourable mentions will be presented along with commentary from jury members and the editors at The Site Magazine. Together, this material presents not only a critical perspective on how legacy shapes the direction of political and ideological undertakings but also a window into the possibilities for architects, landscape architects, and designers to imagine alternative Canadian futures.

The Site Magazine is the current iteration of Canada’s longest running independent architecture magazine. Written by, and for, emerging designers and thinkers, we publish two volumes a year of original writing, design, and art from new voices with fresh ideas. By bringing a Canadian lens to pressing global issues, we aim to cultivate a community of creative and critical thinkers who can influence design futures in Canada and abroad. We are supported by funding from the Canada Council for the Arts and regular partners, including Arts Everywhere. Special thanks to Critical Distance for their support in facilitating this exhibition. Competition image by Shelley Long.

THE SITE MAGAZINE / WWW.THESITEMAGAZINE.COM / INFO@THESITEMAGAZINE.COM

CRITICAL DISTANCE CENTRE FOR CURATORS / WWW.CRITICALDISTANCE.CA / INFO@CRITICALDISTANCE.CA

Opening Reception – MOVING HOME (presented by Critical Distance)

MOVING HOME (presented by Critical Distance)

The Art and Embodiment of Transience Emerging from Canada’s Child Welfare System

Opening Reception: Thursday, August 17, 2017 | 6–9 PM | FREE

August 18 – 26, 2017 | Critical Distance | Suite 302

Hours: On view from 1-6 pm

ZULA, XAVIER BINETTE, WOLFIE, STARCHILD DREAMING

LOUD, SOPHIA NAHZ, SINGING THUNDER, RACHEL MACINTOSH, ODDANE TAYLOR, NICHOLAS RIDICULOUS, M.T. NESS, MICHELLE CHARLIE, JESSIE STONE, GEN GAGNON, ELIJAH M, BETHANY PAPADOPOLOUS, ANONYMOUS, AMELIA MERHAR

Critical Distance is pleased to announce our 2017 Summer Sessions exhibition, Moving Home: The Art and Embodiment of Transience Emerging from Canada’s Child Welfare System. Presented by York University Human Geography master’s candidate Amelia Merhar, this project is the second to be hosted as part of our Summer Sessions initiative, a program through which we support emerging curators and artists by providing free space, mentorship, and installation support for their thesis exhibitions.

How is transience embodied, carried, and performed? How do repeated moves of homes, schools, and communities linger in the body, from the past to the present? What sort of people is the child welfare system inadvertently creating through so many foster and group home placements? Beyond pathologizing transience, what can we learn from the young and hyper-mobile?

Moving Home explores the embodiment of transience as experienced by young people who grew up in the Canadian child welfare system. It is part of Human Geography Master’s thesis research at York University coordinated by Amelia Merhar, inspired by her lived experience in care. Using arts-based, participatory, and Indigenous research methods, Merhar worked with 15 co-researcher artists in their chosen mediums to explore and compare urban/suburban and Northern/rural experiences at the partner youth art organizations SKETCH Working Arts in Toronto and Splintered Craft in Whitehorse. Artistic explorations of the theme of embodied transience include works of photography, textiles, silk-screening, collage, mixed media, dance, performance, music, spoken word, painting, text, jewelry, dream catchers, and installation.

The first Call to Action the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is to reduce the number of Indigenous youth in care in Canada. There are more Indigenous youth in care today than were in Residential Schools. In Toronto, research has shown that Black youth are disproportionately apprehended and stay longer in the system than their non-Black peers (although through recent efforts these numbers are declining). Art alone can’t solve ongoing violence and colonialism; however it is a way to transgress and re-imagine present social boundaries. The goal of arts-based research is to provoke conversations instead of static research conclusions, and we invite you to enter the conversation here with former youth in care and their art.

The show opening is preceded by a research presentation at the Ontario Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth Office from 1-3 pm and the launch of the project zine, TL;DR, a thesis in a zine. All are welcome. 


This project was awarded the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada–Master’s Scholarship –Award to Honour Nelson Mandela in 2016, recognizing its commitment to youth participation. Funding for co-researcher artist honoraria and art supplies provided by Ontario Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth, and the Yukon Child and Youth Advocate. Northern travel and living expenses supported by Northern Scientific Training Fund–Government of Canada.

 

Opening Reception – CAREER LAUNCHER 2017

CAREER LAUNCHER 2017

Opening Reception: Thursday, June 22nd | 6:30pm – 9:00pm

June 22 – July 21, 2017 | 2nd Floor Hallway Gallery

Hours: Open Daily 8 AM – 8 PM

The Centre for Emerging Artists & Designers at OCADU is pleased to present a Photography Exhibition of the recipients of the 2017 Artscape Youngplace Career Launcher. Congratulations to those who have been selected!

This exhibition will be held on the 2nd floor of Artscape Youngplace and presents recent work by the artists:

Lesia Miga:  www.lesiamiga.format.com
Giselle Mira Diaz:  www.gisellemiradiaz.com
Aaron Moore:  www.aaronrobertmoore.com

Morgan Searswilliams:  www.morgansearswilliams.com

Preview Receptio – GENERATRS, presented by CDCC and TOABF
image left: Grace Ambrose, Marc Fischer and Public Collectors, Hardcore Architecture (cover), 2016; right: Eric Oglander, image from Craigslist Mirrors, ongoing

Preview Reception: Thursday, June 15 |  6–10 pm | Free

GENERATORS | June 16–18, 2017

Exhibition on view at Critical Distance in Suite 302 at Artscape Youngplace during Fair hours, Fri–Sat from 12–8 pm and Sun from 12–6.

Image left: Grace Ambrose, Marc Fischer and Public Collectors, Hardcore Architecture (cover), 2016; right: Eric Oglander, image from Craigslist Mirrors, ongoing

How do we see art in the age of image and information overload? Is a gallery the best place to look, or is the internet’s efficiency and long reach a better tool for engaging with artists’ ideas? What about the reliable old standby, printed books?

The artworks on view in this exhibition highlight the fluidity of media in contemporary culture. Each project in Generators is guided by a single idea, approach, or rule. These frameworks generate troves of material for the artists to assemble and present in a manner that invites viewers to make connections that might otherwise go unnoticed. Many of the artworks draw from, or exist as, both printed media and digital spaces. These transmutations afford artists and viewers illuminating points of entry for exploring the unique properties of both printed and digital narratives without being constrained by traditional definitions of the archive and the artist’s book.

Selected from a joint call for submissions, Generators celebrates the astonishing diversity of outcomes that can arise from intentionally constrained modes of collecting and creating. The exhibited works circulate through a variety of platforms, from humble Tumblrs to museum exhibitions. By focusing on projects that start with simple ideas but evolve to open up wide ranging possibilities for engagement and display, Generators pushes against notions of presentation that privilege one form of media over another.

 

Opening Reception – tdsbCREATES Art & Film Exhibition 

tdsbCREATES Art & Film Exhibition 

May 4 – 18, 2017 | First and Third Floor Hallway Galleries

Hours: Open Daily 8 AM – 8 PM, Flex Studio 107 closes on May 14

Opening Reception: Tuesday, May 9 | 6:30-8:00 PM | Free

Students from across the city express powerful connections to the theme of CHANGE through painting, sculpture, photography and film. Teachers and artist mentors supported students as they developed their voices and artistic skills through engagement in rich creative processes. A jury of professional artists reviewed the students’ proposals, provided meaningful feedback, and selected works for the final exhibition at Artscape Youngplace (May 4-18). Please join us for a special celebration of student voice through art and film at the exhibition reception on May 9th, 6:30pm – 8pm.  Remarks at 7 pm.

Opening Reception – Signals & Sentiments
left: Sebastian Benitez, Untitled (from the series Not This Way Either), 2012; right: Josée Pedneault, NÆVUS, 2013–in progress

Signals & Sentiments

Opening Reception: Thursday, April 27 | 6:00-9:00 PM | Free

April 27 – June 4, 2017 | Critical Distance (Suite 302) and Artscape Youngplace Stairwells

Hours: Gallery hours are Friday-Sunday from 12-5 pm, and by chance and appointment. Stairwells open every day from 8 am-8 pm. Closed Statutory Holidays.

left: Sebastian Benitez, Untitled (from the series Not This Way Either), 2012; right: Josée Pedneault, NÆVUS, 2013–in progress

GALLERY: SEBASTIAN BENITEZ, PETAR BOSKOVIC, SHELBY FENLON, MAXWELL HYETT, and MICKEY MACKENNA

STAIRWELLS: MAGGIE GROAT & JIMMY LIMIT, KAREN HENDERSON, and JOSEE PEDNEAULT

CURATED BY: KATELYN GALLUCCI

Critical Distance is pleased to present Signals & Sentiments, a two-part exhibition that examines how gesture functions as a mechanism for the production of identity. In CDCC’s third floor gallery, the exhibition takes the form of an intimate group show for which five Toronto-based artists, Sebastián Benítez, Petar Boskovic, Shelby Fenlon, Maxwell Hyett and Mickey Mackenna, consider the inner workings of the gestural urge. Placing a varied selection of sculpture and photo-based objects in context with each other, exhibition curator Katelyn Gallucci investigates how seemingly divergent artistic gestures might fundamentally derive from inadequacies of language, disposition, desire, and whim.

In Artscape Youngplace’s expansive stairwell spaces, three site-specific installations address the more exterior and transitory dynamics of gesture. Extending themes of self-discovery, the relationship between perception and memory, and the search for emotional connection through time, these encompassing spatial interventions by Maggie Groat and Jimmy Limit (working in collaboration), Karen Henderson, and Josée Pedneault condition the viewer’s bodily response as much as they embody gestural acts and intentions themselves.

Signals & Sentiments is a Featured Exhibition of the 2017 Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival.

About the Artists and Curator

Sebastián Benítez is a Toronto-based artist and curator born in Caracas, Venezuela. His practice explores issues of memory and identity through photography and installation. Petar Boskovic is a photo-based artist currently residing in Toronto. Through generating imagery that inhabits the absurd and intuitive elements of urban space, his practice examines the duality of presence and vacancy. Shelby Fenlon is a Toronto-based artist whose process-driven practice considers the cultural expectations of the photograph, its material constraints, and how they relate to the female body. Maxwell Hyett is a Toronto-based artist whose practice is concerned with how information is made, kept, retrieved, and translated. Mickey Mackenna is a Toronto-based artist who uses gesture and happenstance to manipulate found and industrial materials that provoke relational narratives.

Maggie Groat and Jimmy Limit are interdisciplinary artists based in St. Catharines, Ontario. At the intersection of their individual practices lie mutual fascinations with gardens, the recontextualization of materials, and futurist/dytopic narratives. Karen Henderson is a Toronto artist whose photo-based practice is focused on the relationships between presence, time, and space. Through her “continuous environments”, she explores the mechanisms of photography and the boundaries of perception. Josée Pedneault is a Montreal-based artist whose crossdisciplinary practice poetically navigates the delicate structures and connections that exist between the world and herself.

Exhibition curator Katelyn Gallucci is a photo-based artist currently living in Toronto. She is interested in identity and the psychology of selfhood through the fluidity of representation.

Complete profiles for all of the artists and the curator will be posted to our website soon.

CRITICAL DISTANCE (CDCC)

Suite 302 at Artscape Youngplace | 180 Shaw Street | Toronto | Ontario | M6J 2W5

click for map
Website / Twitter / Facebook / Instagram

Critical Distance is a not-for-profit initiative and space devoted to the support and advancement of curatorial practice in Toronto, Canada, and beyond. Part gallery and publisher, part professional association and community, CDCC is an open platform for diverse curatorial practices and perspectives, and a forum for ideas on curating and exhibition-making as ways to engage and inform audiences from all walks of life. For more info, visit our website or social media pages, linked above.

CDCC thanks Artscape Youngplace for their generous support of the stairwell installations.

Opening Reception – Mountainburger by Aislinn Thomas
Image: Aislinn Thomas – Mountainburger

Mountainburger

May – August, 2017 | Billboard on Shaw Street

Hours: Gallery hours are Friday-Sunday from 12-5 pm, and by chance and appointment. Closed Statutory Holidays.

Opening Reception: Thursday, April 27 | 6:00-9:00 PM | Free

Critical Distance is pleased to announce the selected artwork for the Spring 2017 Billboard on Shaw, a partnership with Artscape Youngplace through which we are providing opportunities for curators and artists to present large format printed artworks for the freestanding mural/billboard outside our building on Shaw Street.

Mountainburger is an 8-foot image by Kitchener-based artist Aislinn Thomas.

Mountainburger will be on view outside Youngplace through August 2017. We wish to congratulate Aislinn Thomas, and to extend sincere thanks to the many curators and artists whose thoughtful proposals for our spring billboard were a pleasure to consider. Stay tuned for new opportunities to submit proposals again in the future.

Please join us to celebrate the new billboard on Thursday, April 27th from 6–9 pm
A reception for artist will take place in our third floor gallery at Youngplace and will coincide with the opening of Signals & Sentiments, our Featured Exhibition for the 2017 Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival.

Critical Distance Centre for Curators (CDCC)
Suite 302, Artscape Youngplace, 180 Shaw Street, Toronto, ON M6J 2W5
See Google map of location

About the Artist

Aislinn Thomas is an interdisciplinary artist whose practice includes video, performance, installation and text-based work. She culls material from everyday experiences and relationships, exploring themes of vulnerability, empathy, possibility and failure. Aislinn is a recent graduate of the University of Waterloo MFA program and earned a BA in Studio Art from the University of Guelph. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally and is the recipient of several grants and awards including a C.D. Howe Scholarship for Arts and Design, a Social Science and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Masters Scholarship, and grants from the Ontario Arts Council and the Canada Council for the Arts. Aislinn currently lives and works in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada.

Critical Distance thanks Artscape Youngplace for their generous support of this project.

Opening Reception – 2Fik: His and Other Stories
Image: 2Fik - His and Other Stories

2Fik: His and Other Stories

Opening Reception: Thursday, April 6, 2017 | 6:00 – 9:00 PM | FREE

April 6 – June 4, 2017 | Suite 104-105

Hours: Tuesday to Friday 12 PM – 6 PM, Saturday & Sunday 11 AM – 5 PM, Closed Mondays & Statutory Holidays

Assuming the multiple roles of artistic director, photographer and model, Montreal-based artist 2Fik stages elaborate tableaux in which he single-handedly plays a cast of characters, both male and female, often re-enacting familiar compositions derived from famous paintings. His photo and performance based works toy with reality and dismantle stereotypes, destabilizing the viewer’s assumed points of reference.

As 2Fik’s first solo show in Toronto, His and Other Stories brings together three recent bodies of work that examine cultural legacies as well as individual and national identity constructs. The centrepieces of the exhibition are his latest compositions that dismantle and reconfigure allegorical representations of nationhood reflected in several historic paintings.

Raising irreverent questions, these satirical reinterpretations subvert the absolutes of nationalistic discourses opening them up to the complex and pluralistic realities of today.

A Primary Exhibition of the 2017 Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival.

Opening Reception – Homework – Illustrative Drawing and Painting (OCAD)

Homework – Illustrative Drawing and Painting Exhibition

Opening Reception: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 | 7:00 – 9:00 PM | FREE

March 20 – March 25, 2017 | Second and Third Floor Hallway Galleries

Hours: Open Daily 8 AM – 8 PM, Exhibition closes at 2 PM on March 25

Image: Homework 2016 exhibition – installation detail.

OCADU’s Illustration Program students, working in nineteen small groups in their 4th Year Illustrative Painting course, curated and developed the exhibition themes and artwork for this collection of group exhibitions.