Exhibitions

At the Artscape Youngplace Hallway Galleries

With over 9,350 square feet of space, the Hallway Galleries occupy the hallways and stairwells of Artscape Youngplace, on (and between) three floors of this beautiful 100-year-old building. Open seven days a week with free admission.

Rent the Hallway Galleries for art exhibitions.


Current Exhibitions

First Floor Hallway Gallery

Second Floor Hallway Gallery

Interpersonal by Sarah Bauman
17 February – 21 February 2020

Third Floor Hallway Gallery

Koffler Gallery

Karen Tam: The Chrysanthemum Has Opened Twelve Times
23 January – 29 March 2020

Critical Distance Centre for Curators

A Big Heritage with a Glorious Past
13 February – 29 March

The Magic Gumball Machine of Fate

365 mini-crumpled cahiers Canada by Pascaline Knight

Billboard on Shaw


Upcoming Exhibitions

EDGE 2020 (Arts Etobicoke)
25 February – 5 March


Current Exhibitions

Interpersonal by Sarah Bauman
17 February – 21 February 2020

Interpersonal is a collection of images, some candid and some curated, illustrating the tender, ephemeral, vulnerable moments of the human experience developed through interpersonal relationships.

Sarah Bauman is a photographer based in Toronto, and is currently attending the photography studies program at Ryerson University. Her subjects are often close friends, siblings, or lovers and soft pink, green and blue tones are frequently used in her work.

Instagram: @ohceaniqque


Koffler Gallery (Unit #104 – #105)

Karen Tam: The Chrysanthemum Has Opened Twelve Times
23 January – 29 March 2020

Curator: Mona Filip

Opening Reception: 23 January 2020, Thursday, 7–9 pm (free admission)
Artist Talk: 26 January 2020, Sunday, 2 pm (free admission)

Montréal-based artist Karen Tam creates immersive installations exploring the way physical experiences of spaces and objects can provide a deeper understanding of specific places, histories and communities. Her recent projects investigate the spatial aesthetics of early 20th century North American Chinese restaurants, opium dens, karaoke lounges and curio shops as sites of cultural interaction. Playing with notions of authenticity, Tam reimagines venues and their material culture, fabricating detailed sets and fake antiques with everyday methods and ordinary materials, bringing them to life.

At the Koffler Gallery, Tam creates a new series of immersive installations to evoke the early Chinese Canadian and other historical photo studios that served Chinese communities in Canada. Her intricate recreations of portrait studio settings and backdrops integrate found and fabricated objects, archival images, 1940s vinyl recordings of Cantonese opera, and mookyu song performances, revealing layered experiences of immigration, displacement and longing.

Tam’s personal impetus for this project is a photograph of her great-grandfather Wong who had migrated to San Francisco in the early part of the 20th century. Like other immigrants at the time, Wong had his portrait taken to be sent along with letters to his family back in Toishan, China. Prompted by this portrait, Tam investigates the emotional and documentary significance of such photographs in revealing the realities of immigration through the implicit tensions of a wishful, reassuring image meant to alleviate separation anxieties by conveying the health and prosperity of the sitter.

Early Chinese Canadian studio photographers and their subjects actively shaped the representation of Chinese identity in North America. Retracing their overlooked existence and restaging the physical environments of these portrait studios, Tam’s installations attempt to piece together and embody absented historic narratives. Furthermore, they seek to evoke similar personal experiences in viewers, positioning these small constructed settings as sites where memory is both encountered and created.

About Karen Tam
Karen Tam lives and works in Montréal and holds an MFA in Sculpture from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a PhD in Cultural Studies from Goldsmiths (University of London). Since 2000, she has exhibited her work and participated in residencies in North America, Europe and China, including the Deutsche Börse Residency at the Frankfurter Kunstverein (Germany), Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (Canada), and CUE Art Foundation (USA). She was a finalist for the Prix Louis-Comtois in 2017 from the Contemporary Art Galleries Association and Ville de Montréal, a finalist for the Prix en art actuel from the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec in 2016, and long-listed for the Sobey Art Award in 2016 and 2010. Her works are in museum, corporate, and private collections in Canada, United States, and United Kingdom. Tam is a contributor to Alison Hulme’s (ed.) book, The Changing Landscape of China’s Consumerism (2014) and to John Jung’s book, Sweet and Sour: Life in Chinese Family Restaurants (2010). She is represented by Galerie Hugues Charbonneau.


Critical Distance Centre for Curators (Unit #302)

A Big Heritage with A Glorious Past
February 13–March 29, 2020

Curated by ma ma (Magdalyn Asimakis and Heather Rigg)

A Big Heritage with A Glorious Past presents the work of Eleana Antonaki and Marina Xenofontos in an inconclusive dialogue around the migratory experience. In their practices, both artists explore transnational feminist perspectives, honing in on the adversities of migration and strategies of settling and creating homes while in exile.

Antonaki’s film Haunting Is An Act of Love (2019) takes place in the distant future where women’s bodies have evolved so drastically to adapt to migration that they have become water. The video functions as a portrait of a woman, a block of water, who tells her story. Her name is numeric: 1,329,784. She explains that the process of evolving was the result of having to cross the Mediterranean habitually over hundreds of years. She speaks through subtitles about her name, how she is programmed to survive, and the bureaucratic power structures that continue to restrict her experience. She continues by speaking of a subversion: that the women in her family have the ability to haunt the places they once inhabited. Drawing connections between archaeology and displacement, which are both considered in their politically motivated sense, Antonaki’s character explains that the women of her time like to return to the sites they were excavated from. This is both their matriarchal heritage and an act of “cheating historical time.” 

In Xenofontos’ work, she examines everyday stories that are inflected with insight into the power structures of civic spaces. For her documentary-style film Sunlight Vandalism (2019), Xenofontos presents two narratives woven together to reveal a diverse portrait of Cyprus and the intricacies of Mediterranean migration. This includes a conversation with a Kurdish mother named Ayşe, who requested asylum in Cyprus in 2007. Speaking in Turkish with her friend—who responds in a Greek Cypriot dialect—Ayşe is depicted swiping through images of her new home in Ankara, Turkey, where she has since relocated. The second portion of the film follows Ayşe in her space of work, where she is a cleaner in a local school, and in her living room, where Xenofontos interviews her in front of her wall of images of Abdullah Öcalan—a once prominent yet controversial leftist political figure. This exhibition also includes found images from the artist’s archive depicting the “lemon-dance.” This peculiar annual event was created by Greek-Cypriot immigrants living in New York City, where couples dance while balancing a lemon between their foreheads until it drops. Through these vistas, Xenofontos reflects on the labour of domesticity and the precarity of settling during politically motivated migration.

Through their work, both Xenofontos and Antonaki explore how notions of home exist in relation to the migratory subject. They ask: How can the body stabilize in the face of exile? How can women’s labour question the precariousness of borders? And, what are new forms through which we can understand dispossession? In bringing their work together, this exhibition reflects on strategies of adaptation, resourcefulness, and survival that occur as a result of, but not in direct dialogue with, political governance.

EVENTS

Opening Reception
Join us for a celebratory reception with the curators on Thursday, February 13th, from 6–9 pm. Refreshments will be served and all are welcome.

Artist Talk
An artist talk with Eleana Antonaki will be presented on Wednesday, March 11th, at 7 pm, in conjunction with this exhibition. Details to be announced soon — follow us on Facebook or Instagram for more information. 


Upcoming Exhibitions

EDGE 2020 (Arts Etobicoke)
25 February – 5 March

Arts Etobicoke EDGE 2020

Now in its 23rd year, EDGE: Youth Art Show is a free arts education and public exhibition program for youth. It is a 10-day, non-juried visual art show, showcasing the artwork of secondary school students (grades 9-12) from TDSB and TCDSB school boards across the GTA. This free exhibition showcases the work of over 150 students with more than 30 schools and agencies participating each year. 

EDGE: Youth Art Show offers various professional development opportunities for young artists which includes: exhibiting in a professional gallery space, participating in a critique of their work, connecting with working artists and the greater arts community. 


The Magic Gumball Machine of Fate

The Magic Gumball Machine of Fate is an artist multiples project that distributes works by Canadian creators and makes art affordable for everyone. The Magic Gumball Machine of Fate is a project by Catherine Heard. www.catherineheard.com  Instagram: magicgumballmachineoffate Guest Curator: Lyla Rye. For information or proposals please contact Lyla Rye: lylarye@icloud.com

365 mini-crumpled cahiers Canada by Pascaline Knight is the 54th edition released via The Magic Gumball Machine of Fate.

This edition of Canada cahiers, made using silkscreen and risograph, was crumpled during my MFA exhibition, When ( i ) stand for the w(hole): Je maintiens mon être entre deux parenthèses embrassées –– Performing the Substrate (2017, Graduate Gallery, OCADU). Each cahier is stamp-dated and numbered in pencil. 

www.pascaline.ca


Billboard on Shaw

The Billboard on Shaw is located outside Artscape Youngplace, 180 Shaw Street btw Dundas and Queen Streets, Toronto M6J 2W5. The exact location is on the front lawn facing Shaw Street just south of Argyle Street on the northeast corner of the building lot. The billboard is at street level and measures 8 x 8 feet square. A label with artwork information is located on the back of the billboard structure.