Exhibitions

Current & Upcoming Exhibitions

Current:

OCADU Career Launchers Exhibition | June 26-July 26, 2018 | 2nd Floor Hallway Gallery | Free

After Rendering on View (Betty Rowland meets Angela Aames), May 27, 2017 – NADÈGE GREBMEIER FORGET | Mural on Shaw Street | Free 

José Luis Torres: Question d’adaptation| June 21-August 26, 2018 | Koffler Gallery | Free

… move or be moved by some ‘thing’ rather than oneself | June 23-August 5, 2018 | Critical Distance | Free

Upcoming:

 


At the Hallway Galleries

With over 9,350 square feet of space, the Hallway Galleries occupy the hallways and stairwells of Artscape Youngplace, on (and between) three floors of this beautiful 100-year-old building. Open seven days a week with free admission. Rent the Hallway Galleries for art exhibitions.

 

CAREER LAUNCHER 2018

June 26th – July 26th, 2018 | Second Floor Hallway Gallery | Free

Opening Reception: Wednesday, June 27th, 2018 – 6:30pm – 9:00pm

The Centre for Emerging Artists & Designers at OCADU is pleased to present a Photography Exhibition of the recipients of the 2018 Artscape Youngplace Career Launcher. Congratulations to those who have been selected!

This exhibition will be held on the 2nd floor of Artscape Youngplace and presents recent work by the artists:

Patrick Corrigan: patrick-corrigan.format.com

Abigail Holt: abigail-holt.format.com

Michelle Homonylo: michellehomonylo.com

Qirou Yang: kiyoyang.ca

 

Centre For Emerging Artists and Designers

OCAD University

100 McCaul Street Toronto, ON M5T 1W1

careerdevelopment@ocadu.ca

 

At The Koffler Gallery


José Luis Torres: Question d’adaptation

Curated by Mona Filip

June 21 – August 26, 2018 | Koffler Gallery

Hours: Tuesday to Friday 12 PM – 6 PM, Saturday & Sunday 11 AM – 5 PM, Closed Mondays & Statutory Holidays

Summer Opening Reception: Thursday, June 21, 2018 | 6–9 PM | FREE
Artist & Curator Talk: Sunday, June 24, 2018 | 2 PM (Program in French)

 

Argentinian-born, Québec-based artist José Luis Torres works with sculpture, installation and public intervention, appropriating spaces and hijacking meaning through simple actions that subvert everyday materials and the conventions of handicraft. Influenced by his experience of displacement, Torres’ creative explorations focus on space and place, generating whimsical artworks where spontaneity and accumulation recur in connection to ideas of economy, survival, labour and the ready-made.

At the Koffler Gallery’s invitation, Torres creates a site-specific sculptural installation focused on three notions central to the experience of migration: camouflage, reflection and construction. Attempting to blend into the new cultural milieu and to mirror social conventions is a familiar process to newcomers. As assimilation indelibly affects one’s sense of identity, layers of individuality risk being chipped away to near invisibility, or reconfigured and rebuilt into ever more complex self-expression.

Metaphorically exploring the adaptation strategies and fluid reinvention of immigrant identity, Torres transforms the exhibition space through material interventions, building an immersive setting that disrupts visitors’ expectations. The installation unfolds as an all-encompassing, seemingly endless construction that reflects the state of precariousness and perpetual change intrinsic to the immigrant condition. Cultivating the ways in which coexisting, unplanned elements can modify each other to generate constantly evolving environments, Torres’ work enables us to re-examine how we inhabit and adjust to our surroundings.

Artist & Curator Talk (Program in French) | Sunday, June 24, 2018 | 2 PM | FREE
In conjunction with his solo exhibition at the Koffler Gallery, José Luis Torres will discuss his artistic practice and the ways in which his work engages notions of displacement, adaptation and identity construction, in a conversation with curator Mona Filip.


José Luis Torres was born in Argentina and has been living and working in Québec since 2003. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Visual Arts, a Master’s Degree in Sculpture and a degree in Architecture. His work has been showcased in many solo and group exhibitions, as well as public interventions in both Canada and abroad, including Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (Québec), Human Cities/Places to be (Brussels, Belgium), Museum London (London, ON), The Works Art & Design Festival (Edmonton – Alberta), Manif d’art the Québec City Biennial (Québec), UCCS Gallery of Contemporary Art, (Colorado Springs, USA), Latitude 53 Contemporary Visual Culture (Edmonton, Alberta), X-Border Art Biennial (Rovaniemi, Finland) and CAFKA – Contemporary Art Forum Kitchener and Area (Cambridge, ON), among many others. Torres has also participated in various artist residencies in Canada, Argentina, the United States, Mexico and Europe. More details.

Image: José Luis Torres, Mutations, 2015.

At Critical Distance


… move or be moved by some ‘thing’ rather than oneself.

Guillaume Adjutor Provost, Adam Basanta, Adrienne Crossman, and Nadège Grebmeier Forget

Curated by Florence-Agathe Dubé-Moreau and Maude Johnson

June 23 – August 5, 2018 | Critical Distance Centre for Curators (Suite 302)

Gallery Hours: Thursday–Sunday from 12–5 pm (except statutory holidays) and by appointment. Information to plan your visit or get in touch can be found here.

Opening Reception & Curator’s Talk: June 23, 2018 2–4 pm | FREE

 

Critical Distance is pleased to present … move or be moved by some thing rather than oneself., an exhibition that considers curating and choreography as materials and subjects. Bringing together the work of Guillaume Adjutor Provost, Adam Basanta, Adrienne Crossman, and Nadège Grebmeier Forget, the exhibition is curated by Florence-Agathe Dubé-Moreau and Maude Johnson. The title, taken from a quote by choreographer Yvonne Rainer, echoes the curators’ desire to question the potentialities of artworks as well as presentation contexts from the position of transdisciplinary instability.

… move or be moved by some thing rather than oneself. examines the intersections between methods of creation and reflection particular to curatorial and choreographic spheres. As part of the ongoing discussion on dance in the museum, this exhibition responds specifically by disengaging from the danced gesture. It gathers artists who, on the one hand, borrow from curatorial and choreographic methodologies; and who, on the other hand, transform the multiple spaces (physical, virtual, social, political, historical, etc.) and temporalities of the gallery.

This exhibition probes at the politics generated or renewed by these two approaches when (re)located together in the gallery space. What performative potentials will emerge from this juxtaposition of the curatorial and the choreographic? Choreography and curating are understood as two transmission systems able to reveal the agency of works as well as of the exhibition structure. Can the analytical tools provided by curating and choreography mutually enhance each other and be used as theoretical frameworks to address the relationships between artworks, exhibition, and publics in a new light?

About the artists

Guillaume Adjutor Provost is a Montréal-based artist. His practice is situated at the borders of visual arts, curating, and literature through hybrid works. He holds a Ph.D. in Arts Studies and Practices from UQAM and is the 2016-18 recipient of the Claudine and Stephen Bronfman Fellowship in Contemporary Art. His solo exhibition have been presented in various venues, such as Centre CLARK (Montréal, 2016), Diagonale (Montréal, 2017), and Bikini (Lyon, 2018).

Adam Basanta is a Montréal-based artist, composer, and performer of experimental music. His sculptures and installations reveal the conceptual and sensory dimensions of sound in the exhibition space by modifying the usual relationship of the visitors to it. His recent projects have been presented in Europe, United States, and Canada. He is long-listed for the 2018 Sobey Art Award.

Adrienne Crossman is based in Windsor. Their approach as an artist and curator questions the normativity of representation and the boundaries of the physical or virtual exhibition environment. They examine the potentialities of a queer sensibility through digital media and popular culture. Their recent projects have been shown in Toronto, Windsor, Carlisle (UK), and Montréal, as well as in The Wrong New Digital Art Biennale.

Nadège Grebmeier Forget is a Montréal-based artist. She employs choreographic and curatorial strategies to complicate access to her performing body in live, video, or installation works. Recent exhibitions and performances have been presented in various venues, such as VU PHOTO (Québec, 2016), She Works Flexible—Flex Space (Houston, 2016), and OPTICA (Montréal, 2017).

About the curators

Florence-Agathe Dubé-Moreau is a Montréal-based writer and curator. MA candidate in Art History at UQAM, her research questions the effects of exhibition reenactment in contemporary art. She was the Assistant Curator for the Canadian Pavilion at the 56th Venice Biennale (2015), co-editor of the book Questionner l’avenir. Réflexions sur la réactualisation de la Biennale de Montréal (2015), and curator of the exhibition do it Montréal at Galerie de l’UQAM (2016).

Maude Johnson is a Montréal-based writer and curator. She holds a MA in Art History from Concordia University. She is interested in the relationship between bodies, times, and spaces. Her research explores performative and curatorial practices, while probing methodologies, mechanisms, and languages within interdisciplinary practices. Her recent projects have been presented in the SIGHTINGS space of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery (Montréal, 2016) and at Artexte (Montréal, 2018).

image: Nadège Grebmeier Forget, Rendering on View (Betty Rowland meets Angela Aames)2017. Performed on May 27, 2017, as part of the installation Walls of Wind: The mirroring and rendering which was created in the context of the group exhibition I’ve Only Known My Own curated by Nicole Burisch and presented from April 21 to June 10, 2017, at OPTICA, Montréal. Photo by Paul Litherland.


After Rendering on View (Betty Rowland meets Angela Aames), May 27, 2017 – 
NADÈGE GREBMEIER FORGET

2018 | Billboard on Shaw Street

Critical Distance is pleased to present … move or be moved by some thing rather than oneself.,
an exhibition that considers curating and choreography as materials and subjects. Bringing
together the work of Guillaume Adjutor Provost (Montréal), Adam Basanta (Montréal),
Adrienne Crossman (Windsor), and Nadège Grebmeier Forget (Montréal), the exhibition is
curated by Florence-Agathe Dubé-Moreau (Montréal) and Maude Johnson (Montréal).

… move or be moved by some thing rather than oneself. probes at the politics generated or
renewed when curatorial and choreographic methodologies are (re)located together in the gallery
space. It gathers artists who, on the one hand, borrow from these two approaches; and who,
on the other hand, transform the multiple spaces (physical, virtual, social, political, historical,
etc.) and temporalities of the gallery. For more information, visit the exhibition at Critical Distance
in Suite 302 (on the 3rd floor of Artscape Youngplace) Thursday–Sunday from 12–5 pm
through August 5, 2018, or read more about it on our website at www.criticaldistance.ca.

Engaged in Montréal’s visual and live arts community, performance artist Nadège Grebmeier Forget
embraces interdisciplinarity and curation in her practice. Recent exhibitions and performances
have been presented in venues such as VU PHOTO (Québec, 2016), She Works Flexible–Flex Space
(Houston, 2016), and CIRCA art actuel (Montréal, 2017).
This photograph is part of a multi-platform intervention by Nadège Grebmeier Forget, which consists of
a selection of archival materials stemming from the performance Rendering on View (Betty Rowland meets
Angela Aames)(OPTICA, Montréal, May 27, 2017) and divided among CDCC’s various communication
channels, including this billboard.

 

CRITICAL DISTANCE (CDCC)

Suite 302 at Artscape Youngplace | 180 Shaw Street | Toronto | Ontario | M6J 2W5

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GALLERY / OFFICE HOURS
Gallery hours are Thursday–Sunday 12–5 pm and by appointment  Office hours by appointment only.
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Critical Distance is a not-for-profit initiative and space devoted to the support and advancement of curatorial practice in Toronto, Canada, and beyond. Part gallery and publisher, part professional association and community, CDCC is an open platform for diverse curatorial practices and perspectives, and a forum for ideas on curating and exhibition-making as ways to engage and inform audiences from all walks of life. For more info, visit our website or social media pages, linked above.